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Westwood grad hosting celebrity talk show from the comfort of his home

The Canadian Press

Growing up in Fort McMurray, David Oulton always had big dreams of becoming an actor but never imagined he would have his own talk show.

But since the start of COVID-19, Oulton has been chatting with celebrities in the comfort of their own living rooms on Amazon Prime and Apple TV. He calls the show Face to Face with David.

“Doing the interview virtually brings you right into guests’ homes and it immediately takes away all the glitz and glamour,” said Oulton. “Everything is peeled back and you have very intimate conversations with these people.”

It was at Westwood Community High School where Oulton developed a love for acting at the school’s drama program. After graduating in 2011, he landed roles on television shows such as Fargo and Hannah Montana.

But when COVID-19 restrictions put many productions on hold, Oulton tried finding ways to keep busy at home.

During each segment, Oulton interviews guests from his home in Calgary while drinking wine and wearing a Versace bathrobe.

“It’s very simple but it works,” he said.

The first season of the show included guests such as original Queer Eye cast member Carson Kressley, actress Vernee Watson and Hollywood blogger Perez Hilton.

“Perez Hilton was the most surprising interview,” said Oulton. “I had this idea of what I thought the interview was going to be like and it went in such a different direction.”

“He was so authentic and genuine and gave such good answers.”

The next season will feature the first African American winner of the Miss America pageant Vanessa Williams, actress and host Melissa Rivers, and actress and fellow Fort McMurrayite Natasha Henstridge.

Oulton’s talk show is rated 8.3 out of 10 on IMDb. He says the positive receptions of the show came as an honest surprise.

“It’s still so surreal,” said Oulton. “I don’t know if it’s because everyone is at home watching TV but I didn’t even expect to get renewed.”

Face to Face with David has been renewed through to 2022 and Oulton aims to keep the show’s format simple as it grows. It’s this simplicity that creates a comfortable space for intimate and interesting interviews, he said.

“The thing about the film industry is that it’s the only place where you can go in for a job and they can tell you you’re too fat, too ugly, too gay or not gay enough,” said Oulton. “It really does take a toll.”

What has kept Oulton going is his passion for his craft as well as remembering where he came from.

“People from small towns all around the world have big dreams of wanting to be an actor, actress or musician but think that being from a small town hinders that ability,” he said. “I grew up in Fort McMurray and I think it’s a really good example that it is possible. Just don’t give up.”

swilliscraft@postmedia.com

By Sarah Williscraft, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter/Fort McMurray Today

Photo: David Oulton standing with show producers Candace Schmidt (left) and Luis Gonzalez (right). Supplied image.

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